The Ultimate Guide to a Low FODMAP Diet
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The Ultimate Guide to a Low FODMAP Diet

FODMAPs are a collection of short chain carbohydrates and chemicals that are either naturally occurring or included as an additive in food that can worsen the symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

 A diet low in FODMAPS has been cited as the most effective diet therapy for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and other common digestive disorders.

What are FODMAPs?

FODMAPs are a collection of short chain carbohydrates and chemicals that are either naturally occurring or included as an additive in food that can worsen the symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), these include:

 

  • Fermentable- Oligo
  • Disaccharides
  • Monosaccharides
  • Polyols

 

These are short-chain carbohydrates that some people are not able to digest. Take a look at our handy FODMAP reference guide, listing the foods you will be able to eat if you’re following this diet:

 

FODMAP Diet Guide

 

How to follow a low FODMAP diet:

It is recommended to completely eliminate all high-FODMAP foods for a period of a few weeks.

If FODMAPs are the issue, then you may experience relief in just a few days.

After a couple of weeks, you can begin adding a few of these foods back into your diet, one at a time. This will in turn help you figure which foods are causing your symptoms.

If you find that a certain type of food causes problems with your digestion, then you will be able to permanently avoid it.

The low-FODMAP diet can lead to improvements in the majority of patients with IBS. It also reduces symptoms in various other digestive disorders such as:

  • Wind
  • Bloating
  • Diarrhoea
  • Constipation
  • Stomach pain

It has become clear that FODMAP foods are usually involved in nearly all of the most common digestive symptoms and disturbances.

Why are some people affected by FODMAP foods?

For some people, FODMAPS pass through most of the intestine unchanged.

When they reach the far end of the intestine, they get fermented by the gut bacteria that reside there.

This is not a bad thing. It is actually how dietary fibres feed the friendly gut bacteria.

However, in some individuals, foods containing FODMAPs are poorly digested, which means that they reach the end of the intestine, and begin to produce gasses as a result of fermentation.

This can lead to flatulence (wind), bloating, stomach cramps, pain and constipation.

The main aim of a low FODMAP diet is to avoid harmful compound, to prevent unwanted discomfort as a result.